AJ Bruno - SDR Compensation | Accelerate 2021

Niharika Ayyagari

By 

Niharika Ayyagari

Published 

March 28, 2022

AJ Bruno - SDR Compensation | Accelerate 2021

Accelerate 2021 was a 2-day virtual summit that featured 12 sales leaders and coaches, hailing from the hottest B2B companies. An event that brought together the top minds in sales whom everyone loves.

This is a blog series where we cover the speaker's speeches from Accelerate. Today, we’ll run through AJ Bruno, CEO, Quotapath's talk on 'SDR Compensation.'


Transcript

David Youngblood

We did it, we made it. We're in the next session. I don't know about all of you, but I'm kind of interested. And looking forward to this section, we got a lot of feedback ahead of time. Some of you work, you're curious about the topic, I think it's something to do with compensation, right, kind of why we do what we do, and what it's all about. So we'll be working with somebody that leads also little to the introduction, but it's AJ Bruno, you know, CEO, and founder of QuotaPath right so he's actually had a successful exit to tears and in the next venture QuotaPath is you know, co-founded by AJ and his team and they've learned a lot about starting a sales lead company versus a product lead when right so what happens when an organization puts the sales or revenue part lead first behind the product and that product follow? There is the former TrendKite President and co-founder, who created a competitive industry that he was, you know, already familiar with. And so, with QuotaPath, there's nothing quite like it out there. It's been built from a pain point that, you know, AJ himself and many of you out there have only experienced as a customer. So, with no further ado, I'll bring AJ on. Let him talk to us a little bit more about what a path but more importantly, we'll talk about SDR compensation, so bear with us. We'll get him here joining us.

AJ Bruno

I made it.

David Youngblood

Yay. Tada. Right on. So, thanks for joining us, man. Welcome to day two of Accelerate 2021, you're a second speaker and our second panelist and again, there's a there's you know, behind the scenes wager going on, about which day is going to be better. So, kind of curious, no contributions, no pressure or anything at all whatsoever.

AJ Bruno

Look, I'm basking in the orange glow of the WeWork phone booth right now. So, like.

David Youngblood

That's called Getting Things Done. Right. That's what our life is all about. This is the new normal.

AJ Bruno

This is my first talk where I'm in this situation where I feel like I've liked the lighting a little bit. It doesn't suit me so well. I'm a fairly pale human being. So, I'm not Yeah, I'm not loving the light right now. But regardless, day two is going to kick day one's asked like, come on.

David Youngblood

Oh, it's been said, you heard here everyone. Alright, well, that will turn it over to you. And we'll pick things back up here at the end for the Q&A session.

AJ Bruno

Yeah, SDR comp and all the things that you just talked about, like I got this. So here we go. I'm going to share SDR comp, we got this, and I'm going to go into presentation mode. I'm assuming David's going to tell me if there are any issues, but we're going to pretend like this is we're good to go. Um, David gave a little bit of a background on myself that I appreciate. I am AJ. I am the founder and CEO of Quotepath. I'm a second-time founder. My first company was a company called trend kite. It was in Austin, Texas. It went from TrendKite to 25 million in ARR. In a span of four years, but more importantly, we went from zero to 150 in sales in like two and a half years, including an SDR and unruly SDR team of 25. That my, my chief of staff at QuotePath ran at tread right Graham Collins. So, comp is a hot topic, it's one of those things that is a little bit of a challenge. The quick story that I'll tell here, while this is presenting, is that I would go through this period where I'd have a rep come up to me, at the end of the quarter, pull up their screen, show me their Excel file of they’re their comp and say, AJ, you've done screwing me again. Like, what do you mean? Like you're paying the incorrectly again, and we had this happen multiple times. And it was so frustrating. So, at the end of my twilight years, at year five year six. I like blew up the whole comp model and started building career paths. So, we'll get into some of this from an SDR standpoint and started to really think about the metrics that make comp run and ultimately lead to founding a company and saying this is so screwed up. I just got to fix this for everyone. All of you people out there have this issue. You got to fix this. So, we did and without further ado, I want to talk a little bit and give some background on SDR comp because that is the topic at hand. That's what you're all interested in. Let's talk about table setting. It is how you get paid control versus benefit? You have all been there where you've as an SDR you feel like well shit this AE is totally screwing the pooch with my, with my deal right now, I'm not going to make anything from it, you have very, very little control over what happens to your own commission. Likewise, I have been there as the VP of Sales founder President being like, oh, my God, all of these demos that are being passed, absolutely suck. This is garbage, what is going on. So, this screen probably makes a little bit more sense after that, as we, as on the company, have very little control of the demos, if you're being comped off of demos, send it all over check, you check off the box and Salesforce field to get make your 50 bucks go for it. But on the other side of it, you have, you might be working with a rep that's on a performance plan, it's on a pimp, and like you’re this deals never gonna close, it's getting pushed, and you're just like on the call shaking your head not gonna happen. So, there is a happy medium, my friends, but there is a time and a place where this qualified op comes into play.

Ultimately, for all of these and not just qualified ops definitions, so important. The first thing you want to start with, and is the definitions of each one of these, and the definition of qualified opportunity here. So important. All right. Gotcha. I hear you AJ definitions are important. What does that mean? Well, here's a slide with a whole bunch of writing. And there are some more slides coming with writing. But you all know what a demo is. You know what this is. But for an SDR team to be using demos to be like the gate. This is fairly early in the company's lifecycle. I'll give you an example quota path. On day one, we're launching the product. If someone's on the phone talking to someone. I'm ecstatic. I'm so happy, of course. So, like, yes, give me all the demos. I don't care if it's your Aunt Susie. It's over in like Europe right now. I will. She wants to talk about my company, I will happily talk about it. So that control factor for the company, when you're first starting, you will talk to everyone why? Because you're still building the product, you're still trying to figure out product-market fit, you're still trying to understand who your ideal customer profile is, who your highest expectation customers are, you don't know shit about shit. And so having your SDRs, like really gated on what they're doing doesn't make any sense. When do you not want to do this?

Well, if you have an overwhelming number of inbound demos, oh, my goodness, I have so many demos, you're getting on demos, and you're being like an order taker. And demos are what you're paying off of not going to work. Ideally, around setting these targets, you want to make sure it's just like very clear, like, you have this sort, you set the target revenue per month, and then you kind of work backward on the demo conversions. Right? So, let's say it's $40,000, your demo value would be multiplying your average contract value. Let's say it's 20,000, by your close rate, 10%. There's $2,000. That's your demo value. Every demo is worth $2,000. Pretty straightforward. I hope this is all connecting very well. You take that number; you divide the target revenue by the demo value. So, 40 divided by 220 demos per month. That's it. I know. It's like not rocket science. But when you look at it right there, it's like oh, yeah, duh. And if you have questions, or you want to, want to like get through different examples, we'll go through them at the end. Don't worry, questions are coming. I can't see. Honestly, I can't see if you're asking questions in the chat. I can't see shit right now. Except for my own screen, there might be one person, there might be 1000 people, I'm talking to you all the same. David's like oh, man, regret bringing AJ onto this thing. Another screen with a whole bunch of shit. Okay, so qualified opportunities. SDRs come off of the number of opportunities they generate. That quality bar is so important. When you want to use this, you understand your world, you understand your target customer, you understand who the ICP is, right? You have a maybe a slightly longer sales cycle. I don't think this is necessarily true, but your ACVs should probably be a little bit higher. Sometimes these are called sales, accepted opportunities, and qualified ops. There are different definitely, definitely different definitions. But that definition is so important to understand exactly what meets the bar and what doesn't meet that quality bar. If the SDRs don't have control over which demos, they're setting, like inbound only it's not a great thing, because like, of course, like they can't have control over that can tell a qualified opportunity. Do you want them to band Mantic better than probably not there? That's not their skill set. What skill sets helping the account executives really have a like great research and discovery into an off that they're coming in. That's a qualified opportunity. How do you do this? Well, again, we're starting with his target revenue. Now Graham made some of the slides like why he couldn't have used $40,000, 50,000 Fine, thanks, Graham $50,000, find your qualified opportunity value by multiplying your average contract value. $33,000 might be your average contract value, and then you have a qualified to close rate of 25%. So, we're getting a little bit trickier with the formula. Here, because you're taking a stage that wasn't the demo to close, now you have the qualifications to close. So, one-quarter of your qualified ops might close, and 25%. In this case, that'd be an $8.25 thousand $8,250. You divide this target revenue by the qualified opportunity value. So doing all that math 50 divided by 8.256, 6 qualified ops four months. Again, you're like, oh, this actually makes sense. And now you're doing all the math on your own comp plans. You're like, oh, shit, this doesn't make sense. You know, maybe it does. I hope it does. I hope you're all like A plus, where my company is fantastic at doing this. Finally, the wanted revenue generated everyone wants to be comped on and earned commissions off of revenue? Maybe not. When do you want to use it? Well, if you're integral to the closing deal, and you have a short sales cycle, meaning that you can see this is less than seven days, meaning you can see light at the end of the tunnel. This isn't always true. But if you think about it from an enterprise level, if I'm an SDR and like, Okay, what's my sales cycle? 12 months? Great. So, I'm an SDR on day one, I'm crushing it at my job, and doing really well on like qualified opportunities. Do you think by month 12, I'm still an SDR? No, probably not. So, like, then I got confused because I have the commission that is still owed for me if I do. If I'm doing really well.

I'm going to probably get promoted. And we'll talk about promotions here. You don't want to do this when there's a long sales cycle. But again, that's kind of maybe true, I'd say like, there's probably half the time we see this half the time we don't. And if the SDRs aren't involved in the sales cycle, it sucks. Because then as a company, you're just giving commission away where like, they're not even really doing anything to that. How do you set this one, you decide on the quota multiplier for your reps? So, this 8x, we actually, if I get time, I'll actually show you what the quota to ote ratio looks like we brought this means that like, if I have $100,000 ote, then I have an $800,000 quota as an AE. So just like that was the 8x right there. So, you take that to the quota to ote multiplier for your reps 8x and multiply their on-target earnings by that number and then divide by quota period, monthly quote, it is a little bit more confusing. But basically, if I had an $80,000, ote and 8x 640,000 would be like the total target for the year or quarterly 160k. That's what the revenue target would be in this case for that. For this, this SDR or you take the historical number of demos set by the team might have 20 a month and multiply it by the demo value 360 K a quarter. So, you're like a month. So, you're basically can- do math slightly differently, again, might be a little bit confusing, might be some questions that we can save you the end of this. All right. Combining two factors. Oh, my goodness. What if you combine revenue and qualified opportunities? How do you do it then? Well, here we go, we will tell you the most common plans to do this. Maybe all three, I would say that that's not great. It's not good at all. You can't I mean having like the activity piece of it and the qualified ops and the revenue. It's a lot to take in. You're an SDR you're just trying to get your legs under you're trying to figure some stuff shit out. So, like, that sounds pretty complicated. Oh, by the way, I will say this, and this is why this is going to make day two really great. SDR is the hardest role in the entire organization. Not just sales, not CS not AM not marketing every fucking job. David sorry, if I'm allowed to swear on this, every job in the company. SDR has the hardest role, by far. And I will freely admit that we don't have any SDR is a QuotePath. So no, not yet. We will next year we're gonna have an SDR. When we want to combine two factors, quality and quantity. So, if I go back to that slide of it, you're like, maybe come on, here we go. Maybe you're along the journey. Maybe you're like we know what a qualified off looks like. And now we're really focused on revenue. So, you're further down this journey. You're like hanging out in this area. Or maybe you're like still figuring out qualified ops. But you want to continue to like comping off of demos. So, you basically have three quarters, one quarter here, and then all here, and then as the company scales Series B Series C You might have one quarter here. Well, actually, you wouldn't do that. Three quarters here, one quarter here to revenue. just made that up. I don't know if the slides disagree with me somewhere. Oh, probably not. Now, they don't disagree. They're good. So, you want SDR ultimately to have control? So, the stage of the lifecycle of the company has to match what the SDR is doing. How do you set these targets? combination, I kind of just went over it. Do you like to figure out what is the most important metric of those three, and you tie it to that? What might be part of the variable or the ote comp? Example SDRs getting paid 500 for a qualified opportunity that they generate, and they get two and a half percent. That's a pretty good plan. Damn, I wish I had that plan. When I started in sales, back in my day, they didn't have SDRs. SDR was one of the things back in 2007 and 2008. So, we did everything prospected the whole call we were a lot of Prospect during calling hours either. might be why my old company just had a massive class-action lawsuit to the tune of $200 million against them. I didn't get any money.

I'm worked for them since 2009. But you can all do your own research and look up through that was spiffs. Alright, there's always this idea of a contest. And I love this because at the end of the day if you're an SDR and a lot of times you're learning sales, and you're all about that team mentality. And that is that team goal. So, spiffs allow you to do this like off. And I guess if there are any sales ops or sales leaders, this is something I would be thinking about quarterly, especially now where things are just being tested. And comp plans change all quarter spiffs are a great way to help incentivize. So, let's give some examples here. Companies launching new products, so any opportunity created during Q1 That includes a demo of that new product is paid out on one and a half bonus, Oh, great. Sounds good, very short-lived for time. Or maybe it's geared towards sports because everyone loves sports. During March Madness, you create an ad meeting, selling competition, you probably have this on a leaderboard or a whiteboard or on a TV, or you can go to a screen. Love that just creates this team-winning mentality. Another example might be you break the SDR team into teams of four and have them compete over the course of two weeks in various different competitions. Demo setting cold calling response rate all that good stuff. The winning team gets a happy hour and dinner, do they get it with the CEO, or do they get it with me. They go fly an airplane with me. I say this because total side note interlude, I just launched a series called value props.com check it out on LinkedIn, where I fly around the country and interview sales leaders from the cockpit of my airplane, or my commercial pilot that didn't come up in the intro. Sorry, totally out of context. Moving on to SDR comp. This was, well look at that, Graham. I didn't catch that either. Same slide. Alright, maybe it is not as good. We have some sloppiness on the slides. Give that feedback. Career Path, what you all want to talk about and no in here, it's really important to lay out that concise career path. If your company doesn't have this clean career path, push them hard to make sure that you understand what it is. How long should I be in this role? And what does it take to get into the next role? Really, really important. This was what I blew up at trendkit back in the days when I just like everyone was pissed off at comp. I was like, let me figure out a career path, first and foremost. And then we can understand and then we can have the conversation. So that was Thank you. I'm going to leave it on this slide while I exit out of the full screen and come back to you. Praying that internet held up that I'm still on the screen and that it's still being recorded. would be bad would be. It'd be a tough, tough situation. No, stop sharing. There. And now we're going to come back. Because I flew through that. David, can you hear me? No, you're taking a call right now.

David Youngblood

No, no, I'm back. I'm back on with AJ now. I'll let him know. Yeah, I'm sorry, HR. I'm sorry. My HR department wanted to let you know that that was not cool, man. I'm just kidding, bro. It's totally fine. Totally fine, man. We're all playing here. We're having fun you're keeping it real which is authentic, which is what we want, and our messaging is all about it. So right and what we teach what we train what we preach. Be authentic. Be real be genuine.

AJ Bruno

We are.

David Youngblood

Yeah, man, that's what it's all about. Right? And this whole new normal, right. HR is freaking amazing. The whole team. I'm kidding. That was a succession.

David Youngblood

It's all good man. No worries. So, we did get some questions come in. So, we're gonna tee those up for you and then let you tackle we'll put them on-screen and then save some time in the end for transition. So, one question I really do like actually was the first one that came up as you said that, you know, he said accept all demo invitations. How do you handle one cedar? Right, What do you do with bandwidth for addressing one cedars?

AJ Bruno

This goes back to the where you are in a stage of the company if there's one cedar that is coming up, I'm expecting the company to be earlier stage because like you probably have a process to gate that out and pricing packaging if you're further down. So, the one theater comes in, and you're like, ah, I don't want to take the sound. Like let me give this a David like he can handle this, you should get this.

David Youngblood

Right. That's what you said too, how do you know, yeah.

AJ Bruno

Um, but there's, there's an opportunity in every conversation. And so, you as an SDR can look, and you're going to do all the research and discovery and you're gonna find out a little bit about that person. But use it as a networking opportunity. Who does that person know? Like, where are the other opportunities for them? You know, the worst is where they come in. Like, we have this situation where I won't call the exact name. It was a city in Texas. You can pick any city; we'll call Houston. It was Houston cruises came in, signed up one seat signed up wanting to expand and was like, freaking out on our intercom like, oh my gosh, how do I fix this? I'm like, alright, well, they figured out that they wanted to use us as a CRM, and we're not a CRM, we are on commission. It's in our name. I don't know how that got screwed up. But I, at some point, I was even on intercom with this person, because I was like, What the hell do they really want, and I ended up having a great conversation about their business. So, me as the CEO playing SDR and you can ask anyone in my company, I'm the best SDR at QuotaPath. Best SDR right here, right here.

David Youngblood

I'm gonna ask.

AJ Bruno

I learned something in the conversation. Don't go to your manager or boss or whatever and complain, because here's what you can do. You have a great conversation. Maybe it's awful. You figured something out about it. Take that feedback. Be part of the solution, not part of the problem. No one. No. Every freaking sales manager has heard since the dawn of time. I don't want to take this demo. Like I get it. You might not but like what else you're going to be doing? You're going to be cold calling me sending out your outreach sales off. I'll play it, Outplay.

David Youngblood

Wait a minute.

AJ Bruno

You absolutely are going to be doing that. But you take the time to actually have an intelligent conversation.

David Youngblood

Yeah, I think for me, in my experience, it's been, you know, him coming to a meeting and some days your kind of back, right? And you prep, and you do all you can you come in and you realize and learn through your discovery that it's like, oh, this is a one-seater, a two-seater. Right, or Joe smoke company or somebody that, you know, isn't, obviously your big whale account, that's gonna get you your number this year. But just stop. Don't worry about that have a genuine conversation with the person that you're spending time with right then in there? Right? I just threw my keyword Oh, so frustrated about this. But had a genuine conversation. And I've gotten some of the best professional relationships, right that I still have to this day, from those little, you know, one-off conversations, because that person like I believe it was yesterday. I forget which speaker, but they said the average time or tenure for employees nowadays is about a year. Right? So, if you have a great conversation with that person today, they might be a future funnel for you. They might be a future referral funnel for you. Right here or elsewhere. So, it's um, yeah, just have a good genuine conversation.

AJ Bruno

When you go back and you go like where did my sales engagement platform fail me and find Oh, I need a new sales engagement platform and you call outplay and you're like, hey, I'll play this since other company's not doing it.

David Youngblood

So, I don't know if I want to pitch it, but I was pitching like little certificates, awards, trophies or something for you know, our different speakers and I think you just won the greatest rebound. Right from worst to best.

AJ Bruno

It is a journey, it is intentional.

David Youngblood

Awesome. Um, and then next question, this one, this one may feel kind of loaded, but it's not. So, what should be the ideal breakdown of base paid in commissions?

AJ Bruno

Yeah, yeah, this was actually asked - I was like, Grant, why do we not have the research on like, comp, play breakdown? And he's like, well, this is a little controversial. It's like, it's a hot button topic. I'm like, that's what the people want. They want to know how much these You get actually get paid. That's why everyone came to like, Yeah, you didn't tell me how much you're actually getting paid. Cops went up for sure. Don't get me wrong. I had it in that last screen on career pathing, we're typically seeing it go from like, it's a 5050 split. So, we are seeing that. But like livability is a thing in major cities. So, we're seeing like, minimum 50k on like the base in major cities, and moving up from an 80 to like, 100 Even now, depending on the sales cycle on the ACVs, but I would say like, okay, two years ago, 65, 75, 80 all in, that's moved up to like 80, 90 and 100. Someone said, 55, 60k base? Yeah, I mean, you're seeing it happen on the east side, where comp is north of 200 for lots and lots and lots and lots of different companies. And you have all this venture capital, just like yeah, you know, companies, you just get backed by Sequoia or whatever, like, just whatever you that you get all this capital, and they've got to spend it somewhere. And so, they're paying lots of money.

David Youngblood

Yep. No, absolutely. So, I think, you know, conceptually as a ratio, there are also some other factors that apply in terms of like, globally and global cultures, right. And or, you know, different industries as well. So, varies by industry, but it varies by geography varies by you know, just I've seen.

One out the UK, we were like, 70, 30. I think over there, they had some laws around it for SDR. But it's definitely moved up across the board for sales overall. So yeah, you know, what I love is, if SDR like were interviewing for any role, if they want to understand the comp more, that's great. But they also want to understand the unit economics and like, the benefits, not just for me, but for like the team and the company. What do you think about that? How are you thinking about that evolution in that career path as your series A turns into a series B turns into a Series C Startup, outsource, I see outsourcing and they're getting to the point where it might outsource?

AJ Bruno

Seeing like anything, whether outsourcing SDR, I don't know how you all feel about that.

David Youngblood

It depends. It's a use case scenario, right? There's, there's, there's a value in a scenario where somebody prefers to spend that kind of money on an outsourced resource, because of time, bandwidth, otherwise, can't build a program out internally, right. So Scenario A, somebody needs to help a helping hand to get the pipeline in second convert revenue and then scale a team, right scenario B is most common that I've seen is, you know, an organization that's, you know, got a one to two years sales cycle right and a half million large sales cycle like going and they pay AEs way too much to sit down on a phone and make calls.

AJ Bruno

The AE, they pay the VP of sales, they pay the CEO too much all these people getting bad. As I said, SDR, the hardest role in the company, artists' role in the company, and doing God's work.

David Youngblood

Absolutely. One more question for you here. Do you think that the inbound SDR commission should be a function of the number of SQLs that are coming in?

AJ Bruno

Yeah, because you're middle, we're working the middle of the funnel, right like you're an inbound SDR. I think there's some level to be said on some level of qualification that's coming in. But also, just the transition and the handoff. I actually love the idea, as help prepped. The SDRs, like preps the up to the AE. And just, there's just something there. I know, we didn't really talk about the activities. But discovery is the most important part of the sales process. And so, like to not have something that just signals that if this is the most important part, then we're going to comp you off of it. Just kind of like a DOD right. Yeah. The SAO sales qualified lead, whatever you want to call it. I'm informing you of that for sure. But the prep work, man, I've seen some SDRs that have like just to knock it out of the park.

David Youngblood

Absolutely. And I like also that you know, one of my key takeaways from what you've been talking about today is that it's not just about the plan you can have and build the perfect plan and platform to deliver and implement a comp plan but if you don't have the fundamentals in terms of career path, for the teams, they can see the intangibles and the future state and can plan a career and see themselves in the future state with your company. Then it doesn't matter what kind of comp you have more or less, I'm paraphrasing, but is that more or less what you're saying? Right? You're like, let me do this first. Can you do a plan until that's done?

AJ Bruno

Until you got this under control? Don't even think about it.

David Youngblood

Right? Right. Gotcha. So, check-in again in the chat here for additional questions.

AJ Bruno

We can talk succession all day long if that's what we that's where we want to go. Actually, I'm not I'm not caught up on the most recent episodes in succession. So, no spoilers in the chat, please.

David Youngblood

Yes. Yeah, no spoilers. That's okay. Yesterday's version of accelerate was sponsored by Netflix and appeared based on the references throughout the day. So maybe we'll just continue that sponsorship. So, any other like, you know, Comp Plan key takeaways, like speaking to SDRs hearing here in the room, right?

AJ Bruno

Understand your plan, just that's the end of the day, like you need to understand your plan. It's just, it's such a shame that sales get a bad rap of like, they don't understand how they're selling or what they're selling. That's not true. And I think that that starts with the SDR level, like, just understand how you're getting paid and why you're getting paid and learn like, learn from the past. Go and make sure you're like the top producer, top seller, top ote maker, and the SDR. And they could have been the best SDR last year and now they're an AE. But like, talk to them go figure out where did they like, think through? How did their comp plan change? You know you want to understand the evolution there as well. So, understand, like, what are the mechanisms, maybe like that person just crushed it. And they close the loophole for SDR. So, you know, that person, like, oh, shit, she just absolutely knocked it out of the park. And now she's screwed it all for all the other SDRs can't do what she did. But okay. Yeah.

David Youngblood

Well, I also think that you touched on this in your presentation, but comp plan should be aligned to the outcomes, and business outcomes that you want of the team. And resources, right. Like, period. You got to align it to that if it's like intangible orbits. Oh, what we'll do, then? Let's see. Let me double-check. Oh, we have another question. What is the transition from SDR to AE look like in a remote sales world? You know, just kind of a little more abstract, bigger picture thinking.

AJ Bruno

Yeah, I think that's like say, what does the promotion tracking sales look like in a remote world is like an even bigger picture on that. I think like, specifically SDR to AE. I, I don't think that there are so many fundamental changes, that I would expect to have to happen. Is it in a career path, like a normal role, there's a career path, right, but like, getting more involved with the sales, sales world? So you might go to a pay-per-view, like an AE review, right? You're already in AE pipe reviews, that's fine. But I think you're getting outside your comfort zone by exploring the company internally a little bit more and learning more about it. So you can't do that as easily as you like, just I'm going to show up to this conference room at this time. And I'm just going to be here. Right. So it's like talking to managers or directors that are responsible for your career. That's step one, that transition. But the actual transition and the onboarding piece of it. I think it's I that has totally taken shape with lots of different curriculums. And I don't want to call specific communities because I'm not sure I will interact with them. But like, there are lots of communities out there that have Enterprise go to market schools that have like, curriculum, I like love that reps are becoming more and more empowered to do that. I mean, for QuotaPath, one of the things that we have is a freemium part of our app that if an SDR wants to track their comp and their commission, they can do that if you're taking a proactive approach that will show so these transitions are now happening with like learning and development outside of your internal company because we're in more of a remote world.

David Youngblood

Right? Yeah, it has to evolve. Yeah. Which has been kind of a part of the theme of Accelerate.

AJ Bruno

For sure. Yeah.

David Youngblood

Absolutely. All right. Well, what we'll do then is, if you're good with it, we'll wrap this up. I speak so fast that twice the content in that 30 minutes that you know.

David Youngblood

It is impressive, what I appreciate you just spoke so emphatically, right? What I learned about profanity a long time ago, from my, wife, a former English teacher, is that an expletive or profanity is just a way to speak more emphatically. Right? If you want to emphasize a point, right? If you want to be emotional, then then it's okay. Right. So it's not as taboo if you had the right perspective on

AJ Bruno

So what you're saying is, if you all watch this, y'all get SDR comp.

David Youngblood

Get it? Hell yeah. That's what I'll say. They're gonna have to bleep that out later, but, okay. All right. Hey, AJ. Man, thank you so much. So appreciate your contributions to that. All the rest of you here, I'll be sharing a poll, again, as far as the custom here now, and give you some time to review that but also welcome and encouraged to jump into the lobby and join our booths. We again, to my knowledge, still have some live presenters there as well ready to interact and engage with you to see if you have answers to this question. All right, we'll see you AJ.

AJ Bruno

See you. Thanks for having me.

David Youngblood

Absolutely.


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