Jason Bay - 2022 Outbound Blueprint | Accelerate 2021

Niharika Ayyagari

By 

Niharika Ayyagari

Published 

March 25, 2022

Jason Bay - 2022 Outbound Blueprint | Accelerate 2021

Accelerate 2021 was a 2-day virtual summit that featured 12 sales leaders and coaches, hailing from the hottest B2B companies. An event that brought together the top minds in sales whom everyone loves.

This is a blog series where we cover the speaker's speeches from Accelerate. Today, we’ll run through Jason Bay's talk on “2022 Outbound Blueprint: Steal this formula to double your results."


Transcript

David Youngblood

Hello everyone, hopefully, you didn't miss us too much. Just been a couple of moments here we're getting a just a moment longer for everybody to finish connecting to the lobby, or sorry, not the lobby to this room. But, uh, our next speaker is very, very excited to present to you all. I've actually cohosted a webinar with a man J bay here. I call him J bay; you can't get referred to him as Jason or Mr. Bay. But, uh, Jay bass,

Jason Bay

Please not Mr. Bay? Feels too old.

David Youngblood

Alright, fair enough. Fair enough. Yeah. Jason, definitely glad to have you back. You know, you're obviously a thought leader in our space and a contributor to our world, of blissful prospecting. Right. Which is, some would consider or argue that that's an oxymoron. I'm kind of curious about your take on that. Yeah.

Jason Bay

Where I kind of came from is that, yeah, really where it kind of came from is that outbound is one of those things, that's traditionally a very tough thing that people have to force themselves to do, in a lot of that, I believe, is because people don't feel good about the process that they have. And they don't feel good about the message that they're gonna say, and they don't feel confident. And the opposite of feeling, you know, like, like, it's a lot of work is to feel like it's like smooth and that, hey, I can go do a really hard work out, so to speak. But if I know what I'm doing, and I do it together with people, it doesn't make it so bad. You know that that was kind of the idea behind blissful.

David Youngblood

I like it. I like it a lot, man. That's pretty awesome. So obviously, we have here today, you're going to be talking about an interesting topic. Outbound blueprint, right. So, you're trying to suggest a specific formula to enable, you know, our audience had double the results in 2022. That's right.

Jason Bay

Yeah, absolutely, man. Okay, well,

David Youngblood

What we'll do is we'll turn it over to you. I'll go ahead and jump off. So, I'm not stealing the show anymore. And, and join back on for some Q&A towards the end.

Jason Bay

Cool. And let me just make sure that I have everything on my end, you guys. The first thing that I wanted to do here. So, we're going to talk about the 2022 Outbound blueprint. But before we get into that, I got a quick poll for you. I'd love for you to share in the chat. Looks like there are some folks here. This will let me know that you're alive. You're out there. I require a lot of participation in the talks that I do. So, hope you're on board with that, but let me know got a question for you.

So, in an hour of your time, how many quality meetings would you have to set up in order to consider sending a blind calendar invite to 25 Cold prospects? So, this means that this person's never heard of you before, and you send them a calendar invite to hop on a meeting with you? They've never heard of you before. So, give me an A, B, C, D, or E. How many meetings if it took an hour of your time? Would you have to set it in order to justify sending out blind calendar invites? Let me know in the chat sugar beet says hey, Elliot, what's going on? James says B but. I'm hoping I'm pronouncing right a Chris says, he would never do it. Let me know to keep them common. I like to have a lot of interaction. I can't see you guys; you can see me that's the awkward part about doing virtual events. It helps me know that you guys are there participating. Love it. So, it looks like most of you guys. Yeah, it looks like most of you would actually consider doing this. I want to be really clear, I'm actually not an advocate of that technique. The truth is that a lot of reps have used that technique to land meetings, I want to be really clear, I'm not asking you to do that. So, I want you to think about that for a second. reps have used this technique to land meetings. But that doesn't make it a good decision. To use that technique. What I want you to think about is decisions versus outcomes. This is based on a book I'm going to share with you guys here in a second. So, let's take seatbelts. For example. If you decided to not wear a seatbelt for an entire year, and never got into a car accident, never got hurt, never got a ticket. Would that make not wearing your seatbelt for an entire year a good decision? No, it wouldn't. Conscious contrary to that if you wear your seatbelt every single day for a year and you did get in a car accident and something really bad happened that doesn't make wearing a seatbelt a bad decision. So, decisions and outcomes are actually two totally different things. I want you to think about the things that you decide to do and the outcomes of those things. I want you to separate them. And this is based on a book Annie Duke recalled thinking in bets. Her whole philosophy about decision-making is to think more like a professional poker player which she was. And she said improving decision quality is about increasing our chances of good outcomes, not guaranteeing them. So, 2022 my message, before I go into this, I'm going to share a lot of tactical things with you guys. Today, I'm going to run through some frameworks, I'm going to ask you to participate, which a lot of you're doing, which is awesome. 2020 is going to be all about making better decisions about how you decide to communicate with prospects who didn't ask you to reach out to them. Because right now, if we look at outbound as a game of probability, there is according to Clear bit, a 1% chance that a prospect replies to your cold email 1% chance. So again, if we're looking at probability here and odds, there's a one in 100 chance that you're going to get a positive or a reply, excuse me, positive or negative to a cold email. Anyone want to guess what this 1.4% This 1.48% represents? Let me know in the chat, what do you guys think this is? We talked about cold email. What do you think this is? Now, it's not open rates. Good guests, though. It's not a reply to rates. It's cold calls LV. Yep. Bill. Yep. So according to Gong, the chance of a positive outcome from a cold call, think about that. A cold call right, now you have a 1.48% chance of a positive outcome from a cold call. And just to give you some perspective, you have a higher chance of getting food poisoning this year than getting a positive reply to your cold email, or a positive response to your cold call. So, I don't know about you. I'm not really happy with these odds, one and 1.48% chance, but I want to talk about is how you can increase your odds into double digits of getting positive replies to your outreach. All right, so let's go to the framework. So, what I want to walk you through here is we're going to talk about three frameworks. All right. And my goal and sharing with you is that I want to give you two or three really actionable things that we can take away from this.

And we're going to talk about it today through the lens of cold calling, which is actually the example that I'm going to use. So, without bound, I like to think of it in three buckets here. Okay, outbound gets a lot easier, when we can do these three things effectively if we can identify, engage, and create. So, identity is your ICPs. And personas. So, this is the ability to engage people, or prior to engaging them, excuse me, this is the ability to find the right people at the right accounts and making sure that those are a good fit. I'm also going to share with you three key shifts that you need to make in 2022. Okay, so the shift that we need to make and how we identify people, is that we need to find a way to move from mass blast to quality first. And I'm going to talk about how to do that in a second. What we need to get really good at is spotting patterns within our ideal client profiles. So that when we go to reach out to people if you guys pretend like this is your target market here. Mass blast, says, hey, all the emails and calls that I'm going to make on this target market, I'm going to treat everyone as one, regardless of their persona, their use case, whatever it might be, we need to be able to find a balance between that and what I call quality first. So, the balance here is that we need to be able to take this target market and break it up into large groups of people that have patterns between them. That could be patterns in the trigger event. So, for example, a trigger event could be the companies hiring, they released a new product, it could be specific industry industries, it could be specific personas, we need to be able to reach out to pockets of people who have very similar things going on with very similar situations. That's a big shift that we need to make. Alright, so second, engage. This is how we choose to start conversations with people. So, this is our messaging. And our sequences. I'm going to focus today because we only have about 40 minutes, I think it is I'm going to focus today a lot on the message, particularly through the lens of how to do a cold call. But what we need to get really good at here is we need to figure out how do we move from me-centric to user-centric and the way that we do that the thing that connects the identity engages bucket together, his priorities and problems. So, what we need to get really good at is talking about what our prospects are working on and problems that are getting in the way of doing that not our product. We got to be experts on our prospects, not our products. That's a really big shift that we need to make in 2022. And lastly, create. This is how we secure meetings. So, the shift that we need to make here is we need to move from ABC, always be closing. Don't get me wrong, I love Alec Baldwin, love Glengarry Glen Ross, not a great movie on how to do sales, though. So instead of always closing, always asking for a meeting, asking for 15 minutes, peppering them with a demo, ask, what we need to get really good at is what I call to teach, don't take. So, we need to think about what we can teach our clients. And I'll give you an example. I worked with a company that sells an automated welding solution. It's hardware and software as a service. So, they essentially say, hey, large manufacturer, we could replace your need for welders, by putting a machine in there that will do all the welding for them. So, you don't have to hire people anymore. The thing that they teach their prospects in that very first sales call is they say, Hey, there's a huge labor shortage with welders right now. The need for welders is growing by 8% Every year, and the supply of welders is decreasing by 3%. Every year, there's a gap here, we're going to talk about what other manufacturers are doing to fill that labor gap. That's something that they're going to teach the person on the call what I'd love to hear from you in the chat is to let me know, what could you teach your prospects, even if they decided not to move forward after they meet with you where you're at on that first call? And they decide not to move forward with you? They decide damn things after that first call. What would they learn? from you guys? What could you teach them?

By the way, teaching them about your product doesn't count. What are they going to learn independently of your product? Adam says about a business. Paul, Hey, what's up Paul? Paul says industry trends. Let me know in the chat, what you feel a prospect could learn from you specifically, or your AE is going through a sales process with you? What would they take away from that? I got case studies. All right. That's the part where I need some more participation. Do you guys look at what could they learn from you? Yes, exactly, Vikram. So what problems are their peers facing? So don't be shy, if you could be more specific with value get a better way to go about their business, how to go from pain to pleasure industry best practices. All right, cool. Very good. So, teach don't take. And typically, what will need to happen here is that we need to get good at handling objections. So again, those three key shifts, I'm not going to talk about all of them, because we don't have time to talk about all of it. But where I'm going to spend some time with you today is one, we have the framework. That's what we just went through. I'm going to talk about messaging. So that's what to say. And then we're going to use cold calls. As an example. I'm also Youngblood if you could put a message in Can you let me know when my stop time is I just want to want to manage the time. Effectively here, let me know when the stop time is. I would really appreciate that. Okay, so here's what we're going to do. I'm going to run you through a framework that I call the prospect path. All right, thanks, David got 11:15. So the prospect path works like this. All right, our prospects, if you imagine them on a path where this axis here is time, and this is results. They're on a path from their current state to a desired future state, and in a desired future state. What I want to focus on with you guys right now, what we need to do before we pick up the phone and call someone or send an email, is we need to understand two things about their current state really one thing. It's what are their priorities? Okay, so I'll give you an example with that welding company and I was talking about one of their targets is VPs of manufacturing. One of their big priorities is figuring out how to solve the labor gap right now. They'd need more welders to keep up with demand and production. And they need to figure out a way to put people in the seats faster, get them trained, and make sure that they retain them. That's a priority. That's something they're working on. What I would love from you here in the chat, is to let me know to give me one prospect that you reach out to give me a job title, and then tell me what their priority is. This exercise is going to help here When we do the cold calling section here in a second, I'll be out in the chat here. What is a job title? And I'll put this into the chat job title plus a priority. Yeah, so Harshit and he has I know I'm butchering names here so please forgive me. So, generate revenue through customer service on their website. I love that that's specific. I want you guys to get more specific. So Kelson you said HR turnover like what industry are they again? What kind of turnover they prevent does have anything to do with remote workplaces I want you guys to get pretty specific here? Yeah, so CRM managers get more customer engagement by moving and relocating teams Yeah, B2B CEO needs to hire a first-time part-time salesperson to do what? Selena to grow revenue to scale the business let me know what is the outcome that they are driving? So Aveiro When you say moving and relocating teams, what is the outcome of that? Let me know. Yeah, improve employee experience in the org and let me know. What's the outcome of that? Yeah, Brian, customer affinity. That's a pretty good one there we had to get sales out of the hands of the see. Okay, that's exactly Selena, like what you're talking about right there. That's exactly what I'm looking for. So, I'm gonna actually write some of these down, because they're good to have as examples here. Okay. So, if we use Selena as an example. Alright,

Selena, yeah, B2B CEO. So, let's just use B2B CEO. Alright, so the priority for Selena as a prospect is to get sales out of the hands of the CEO and generate more sales, get past the revenue ceiling. Okay, now, what you're going to want to do is a couple of things. So, the desired future state is essentially an aspiration. And what we do in sales is we help people to a desired future state. And what we do is we help them avoid undesired future states. problems. So, we're helping people to aspirational things that they want to accomplish, and we're helping them avoid problems. So, what I want you to think about now, and we're gonna move a little quicker here because I want to make sure to get to the cold calling piece. What I want you to think about is sharing it with me in the chat for your prospects with their priorities. What are some things if forward-thinking 612 months from now? What are some of the things that they want to accomplish? What are their aspirations? And Selena, I'm totally down to use you as an example here, too, if you want to make sure to put that into the chat. So, with your b2b CEOs, they want to get sales out of the hands of the CEO and generate more sales to get past the revenue ceiling. What do they want to accomplish? 612 months down the road? What aspirational do they want to accomplish? And let's start with that. So, help me out in the chat here you guys for your prospects, what do you feel is aspirational for them? What are their goals? Like if they were to set a new year's resolution for their business or their role? What would it be? Yeah, Bill says double revenue. Yeah, I want to have some time off. Yeah, really good. Grow the workforce, they want to scale their business. Alright, you guys are awesome. I'm just writing a couple of these down because I'm going to give you some practical examples. Here are examples here when we do cold calling. Okay, one last thing I want you to focus on. Now, this is really good love. And the participation you guys are I want you to focus on problems here. So, what are some of the things that get in the way of that? So, if you're Celina, you want to get sales out of the hands of the CEO, generate more sales, and get past the revenue ceiling. The aspirational thing is you want to build to have some time off, you want to focus on building other parts of the business, and what's getting in the way of that. And the reason why the problem is closer here in time is that problems are typically things impeding progress right now, or in the next month. So, what are some of those problems? And what I'm going to do is I'm going to walk you guys through a cold calling framework. So, you can just see this messaging framework in action. This, by the way, sit down and actually create what I call a messaging matrix put this onto like a spreadsheet with columns for each of the prospects because they’re their priorities have shifted in 2022. People typically want to accomplish different things, the markets changing all of that kind of stuff. It's good for a refresh. Okay, so really good stuff there. All right, cool. Everyone is good. So far, if you could give me like a good to go in the chat, if you've been following along, you're like, Okay, Jason, I'm good. Like, give me the goods talk about cold calling. Give me a good to go on the chat. So, I know that you're still alive out there. You're participating. Cool, we're good to go. Alright, I get some of my tea here. You guys are awesome. Okay. Good. Thank you, Elliot. Alright, so let's talk about how this framework applies within the context of a cold call. Alright. And where I'm going to particularly focus on the cold call, is the intro of that cold call. Alright, so with our cold calls, we need to do a couple of things. Okay, the way that I like to break this out is we have an intro, we have a hook. And then we have a close. The reason why I like to break this out is that there are certain things that you need to accomplish at each stage of the cold call. So, if we look at the intro piece here, let me zoom in. This is really like the first 30 seconds. All right, let me get a smaller pen here. So, there are a couple of things that we want to do. What I want you to think about is, what is it like to be your prospect in the cold call? So, what's it like as a prospect? So, think about this for a second? What's it like as a prospect? When you look at your phone, here, you see an unknown number and you decide to pick it up. Think about what's going through the head of that person. All right, we have to address those things. A lot of times what your prospect is thinking is the same thing you would be thinking picking up an unknown number. Is this a person? Is it an emergency potentially? Is it a customer? Is it someone on my team trying to get a hold of me etc., etc.?


So, what we want to do really quick is a couple of things, we want to remove the surprise, and then we want to use what's called a permission-based opener. So sounds something like this. Ring ring, a person picks up hey, this is Jason from blissful prospecting. I know, I probably caught you in the middle of something, but you got 30 seconds for me to tell you why I'm calling. And then you could let me know if you want to keep chatting. Sandler Training kind of popularized upfront contracts. I like permission-based openers, any variation of that is really good. What you're allowing to do the prospect to do is to opt into the phone call, you're allowing them to have a choice. And by doing that, it feels a little counterintuitive. But when prospects feel like they have a choice, they're more likely to actually say yes. So, I'll give that to you one more time. Remove the surprise, hey, this is Jason was blissful, prospecting, permission-based opener, a, hey, I know probably catching the middle of something, but you got 30 seconds for me to tell you why I'm calling and then you can let me know if you want to keep chatting. So, the tonality is really important there too. I want to sound very sure of myself, I'm going to get the person to opt-in. Now, let's talk about the next part of the call. This is where most people mess up. The next thing that comes out of their mouth is an elevator pitch. So, if I'm using what Selina shared as an example, this is where people make a mistake. They say, hey, can I get 30 seconds to tell you why I'm calling then you can let me know if you want to keep chatting prospects as Yes. And then I say, hey, my name is Jason again, I work with ABC Company in what we do is we work with CEOs to help them get sales out of their hands so they can generate more sales. We work with companies like XYZ, and they're accomplishing these results. I was hoping we could set a meeting up for later this week. That's how a lot of reps will approach the cold call. The problem with that approach is that you sound like every other salesperson that's calling them. But let's look at what that violates here. What that violates is this piece that's me-centric. When you call a prospect, and you could call them, and you talk immediately you start the conversation with you and what you do. You're making it all about you. That's me-centric. What we need to do instead is actually need to start with the prospect. Okay, so let me open this up. Here's what that sounds like.

Alright, so instead of doing an elevator pitch, what we're going to do instead is what I call a priority drop. So, I'm going to basically give the prospect a multiple-choice question. And I'm going to say so if I'm calling Selena, I'm gonna say, hey, again, my name is Jason, I'm giving you a call Selena because I talk to a lot of CEOs of companies. And one thing they tell me they're really focused on is getting sales out of the hands of their CEO, you. So, they can generate more sales. And they want to get past that revenue ceiling. So, you may want time off when to focus on other parts of building the business. That's the first thing I hear. And the second thing I hear is XYZ, which one of those two things are you most focused on right now? Right, so I'll give you an example with that welding company. It's their scripts that sounded something like this. Hey, this is Jason with ABC Company. Look, I know you're probably catching the middle of something. But you got a minute for me to tell you why I'm calling, and you can let me know if you want to keep chatting. prospect says yes.

Well, hey, the reason I was calling is that I talked to a lot of VPs of manufacturing. And one thing they keep telling us right now is that there's a really big focus, around welders, particularly around the labor shortage of welders. So, I noticed that you guys are hiring three welders right now, in MIG welding positions. And what we keep hearing is that you want more of these folks, and they're just not sticking around for whatever reason for you to meet your production targets. The second thing I hear has to do with automation. So, if you're like a lot of the manufacturing plants, he automates probably about half of the parts on the trailers that you guys are making. And for those other halves of the parts that highly custom, low volume parts, you may have tried to automate in the past and for whatever reason weren't able to, I'm really curious. Which one of those two things are you most focused on right now? So, I'm talking about the prospect. Pretty cool, right? And you know what you might be thinking, well, they don't know what I do, Jason. If they're curious, they'll ask, think about that. Like, one thing I want you guys to think about is sales. One thing that happens is I want you to think about relationship dynamics. Okay. The relationship dynamic that salespeople get put in way too often is as a salesperson, I am a pursuer, and the prospect is being pursued. Right? We as salespeople we're running after our prospects, a way that we can break that dynamic is by starting with the prospect first and getting them to ask us a question. Pretty cool, right? So, what we can do here is if we start with them and do a priority drop, and that language, got it, by the way, you got to nail it. Right, and let me look here, there were a couple of other people that had some stuff in the chat, which was really good. But Celine, I'll just use yours as an example. Again, I love how specific it is, I talked to a lot of CEOs. And what I hear that they're working on is they want to get the hands, they want to get out of sales so that they can generate more sales as a company and get past a revenue ceiling. That's so specific. So, it can't just be grown revenue. All right, it's got to be super-specific. Alright, so once we've done this, and look at the time, we got 12 minutes here, so I'm going to be quick with this part. So, if we nail that priority drop, the prospect usually will say something like, well, yeah, of course, I'm working on that, or I'm working on both those things. And what that allows me to do is actually filter the conversation. And then what I can do is what I call questions to stack around problems.

Okay, so in this piece, instead of saying you have this problem, I'm going to do what's called question stacking. And question stacking. I don't have I mean; I could do a whole hour just on question stacking, but the formula works like this. I'm gonna stack context, in front of a question. Okay. So, the way that might sound with Selena is something like this. Because the problem she put down was that they don't understand sales and don't know how to manage salespeople or set up sales processes. So, I'm not going to ask, what’s your biggest challenge been? in growing your sales? That question makes me look very uneducated. Like, I don't know their world. So, I'm gonna stack context in front of that question. And it's gonna sound something like this. So, if the CEO is like, yeah, you know, I actually am focused on getting out of sales. What I say is, hey, interesting, because what I'm hearing from a lot of CEOs right now is that they may or may not have come from a sales role themselves. So, they never had to formally build or set up a sales process. I'm really curious, how have you approached building your sales process? So, do you know what I'm doing there? I'm stacking context. Here in front of the question, I'm putting the problem in front of the question. And then I'm asking how what we're going to question around that problem. Some demonstrate business acumen by asking a smart question and then making an open-ended. And what this allows me to do, before I move into the close is I'm going to come up with two or three really good questions. And then I can move into the close. By doing two things, I'm going to summarize and then get an agreement. So again, if I'm selling an app, you're getting free coaching here. So, what I'm going to do is, I'm going to summarize what they shared. So, I'm going to say, hey, what I heard from you is that you're, you're building a sales process right now, you haven't had to formally do it before. And some of the issues that you're running into are like, you know, what kind of CRM to use, what stages of the sales cycle you should talk about, and really just how to support a rep. That's the summary part. And then they get the agreement part, I'm gonna say, Did I miss anything? So, I'm just summarizing, this is how you segue, by the way, the total power move, is you want to be the person to cut the call off. So, when you ask a couple of questions, get some problems, and don't let the call go on for 20 minutes, you're going to cut the call off. So yes, a couple of questions, get what you need. And then you're going to be like, hey, so what I'm hearing is this, this and this, did I miss anything? Prospects will usually say now. And then what I'm going to do to schedule the meeting is I'm going to ask this question, I'm going to say, Can I make a quick suggestion? And usually, the prospect will be like, the respond kind of funny, like, yeah, what what's going on? And like, I promised they'd be short at the beginning of the call. These all sound like things that we can help you with, from the work that we've done with x and z companies. How about we unpack this at a time when I'm not cold calling you in the middle of your day? Do you have your calendar handy? And then I'm going to go schedule the meeting. And I'm going to do what I call a triple confirmation. So, I'm going to send the invite on the call to them, and get them to accept it. I'm going to confirm the agenda one more time with them verbally, what we will be covering in that call, that's where the 'teach don't take' thing comes in. And then I'm going to send a confirmation email. So that's your cold call. Alright, so just to backtrack here for a second, with our intro, what's really important is that instead of an elevator pitch, I want to do a priority drop in the priority drop can't be Hey, I talked to CROs. And one thing they tell me is that they want to close more revenue. People are gonna be like, Thanks, Captain Obvious. That's what every CRO wants to do. Okay, it needs to be really specific, where it's like, hey, I talked to the VP of operations. And what they keep telling me is that sales, their sales team is selling so much that their production team can't keep up. They're having trouble hiring welders right now. That's how specific I want to get with that priority drop, I want to give them two or three options. Now go over the closing again here in a second Harshit. So that priority drops, I'm going to give them a multiple-choice question. And typically, if you've nailed this, people do like one or two, or they'll say both, and whatever may be the hook. I'm going to filter that conversation with the priority drop, and then I'm going to question stack around problems. So, I'm not going to say what's your biggest lead gen problem right now. I'm gonna say typically when I talk to marketing leaders like yourself, they've tried paid ads, and the cost keeps creeping up on the Facebook ads, and Instagram ads, there's a lot of you know, with iOS changes, things are kind of a problem. I'm really curious. Do you use paid ads? And if so, what have you noticed about the conversion rates and the cost per lead? Or the CAC, right, whatever terminology that you want to use? I'm going to question stack around those problems. I'm going to stack context in front of the question, and then I'm just going to summarize back to the prospect what I heard. And we're going to get an agreement, I'm going to say, hey, did I miss anything? Usually, they'll either add to that, or they'll say no. Have you noticed here too, one thing I want to highlight is that everything that we've talked about so far is I'm getting the prospect to talk about their problems? I'm summarizing what they said, and then I'm getting the agreement on what they said. I'm not saying anything about myself. If they ask you what you do, that's a good thing.

You want them to ask you what you do. Alright, so I'm making it all about them. So, I'm gonna get an agreement. Did I miss anything? And then I'm just gonna say, hey, can I make a quick suggestion? Yeah, everything you shared today is something that it sounds like we could help you with based on the work that we've done with other companies like X, Y, and Z. And I promise that'd be short. How about we impact this at a time when I'm not calling you in the middle of your day? Get your calendar handy. Then I'm going to go in, and I'm going to confirm the call. All right. So just to kind of summarize today, there are a couple of things because I want to leave a minute or two here for q&a. There are a couple of things that are super important. So, when you're thinking about 2022, what I want you to think about is identifying, engaging, creating the framework, and making those three key shifts. How do we find a balance between mass blast and quality first, how do we be less me-centric More you-centric, talk less about us more about them? And instead of always be closing, how can we teach don't take what can we teach our prospects? All right? The second thing that you need to do is that messaging matrix. So that prospect path framework that I showed you do that for your prospects, say, hey, I reached out to CEOs, what are their priorities? What are the problems that get in the way? And then how do I help them. And then lastly, I use cold calling as an example, adjust your talk track, adjust your cold emails, and adjust your LinkedIn messages to be more you-centric. So, what I'd like to do here Alright, so what I'd like to do really quick, is can you share with me five minutes can you share with me in the chat? What was your biggest takeaway from this session? What was most actionable for you? Share it with me in the chat. I'll give you guys like 30 seconds to do that. I'd love to hear what did you take away most? From today? Yeah, put them first. Yeah, yeah. Yeah, the closing part, the insights piece. Very good. Let me know in the chat, what was your biggest takeaway? Oh, David, what do you want to do right now? Do you want to save go hit some questions, or what do you want to do?

David Youngblood

We're gonna do a little quick q&a session. My takeaway is I definitely geeked out on your nerd level, your nerd game, with your screenwriting presenting material like I'm totally jelly. Definitely got to get some like that for myself and my presenter game. But uh, looks like we got some questions coming through. It's a comment, check out the Q&A. Terry asked, what was that book? So, it was a book earlier that you were referencing or showing earlier on? Yes, no?

Jason Bay

Yeah, the book is thinking in Bets by Annie Duke. I'll put that in the chat.

David Youngblood

Thanks. And I'll ping you on LinkedIn or something separately for the scoop on the software and tech that you use? So, I'll mark that as answered. Yeah. And then you actually got my interest piqued. Because you're like, there's this whole other thing that I could talk about for an hour on called question staking. And I'm like, but I want to know more about that. So, if I'm not alone in that thought, how can our audience go about learning more about that topic from you?

Jason Bay

For that topic specifically, here's what I would do.

David Youngblood

Could you do like a January February webinar on question stacking?

Jason Bay

That's what I was thinking we could do that and check out also I got a website here. blissfulprospecting.com and I did put together a little freebie for you guys. So, if you check out that blissfulprospecting.com/bitesized, that's actually like, got links to all of my best content. So, podcasts, LinkedIn posts, all of that kind of stuff. So, book, that bite-size document. Yeah, bookmark that there's a bunch of stuff in there around email, cold calls, etc. I don't know if there's anything specific or in question stalking. But yeah, we could definitely do a webinar on that for sure.

David Youngblood

Right on. That's awesome. All right. Anybody else? Last chance? Any thoughts, questions, comments, or feedback for J Bay? Definitely lots of love. Love that. Awesome. Well, Jason, thanks so much, man. Again, truly a pleasure to have you. I'm looking forward to our new already figured-out topic for the Jan/Feb webinar. So well done there. For good, useful content. So Excellent. All right. With that audience, we'll turn it over to a poll as we transition to the next session, which will be in about five minutes and 45 seconds, give or take a few technical errors. Excellent.

Jason Bay

I just dropped my LinkedIn profile in there. Follow me on LinkedIn if you're looking for daily outbound content.

David Youngblood

Yep. Excellent. All right, Jason. Well, thanks so much. Again, we'll definitely be talking to you, and Happy Holidays to you and yours.

Jason Bay

Sweet. Bye everyone, thank you.


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